The Selling Factory

How to Develop Your Unique Elevator Pitch

Written by Yoo Hyeon Park

A marketing student at the University of Florida, Yoo Hyeon interns at The Selling Factory, enjoys interacting with consumers and finding solutions for potential needs of the consumers.

Photo by Hồng Xuân Viên from Pexels

During the school year, many universities hold career fairs where recruiters come to seek talent. As a student, you may feel overwhelmed or even lost by the vast number of students trying to secure the same internship that you want. So, you must impress the recruiters by selling yourself. You need to start conversations where they will be wanting to continue talking with you. But how and where do you even start? 

This is where an elevator pitch comes in handy. What is an elevator pitch? It is an about 30-second long, brief introduction of yourself. It is a gateway to open up more meaningful conversations with the recruiters, leading to stronger connections with them (Petrone, 2014). Having a well-prepared elevator pitch will allow you to stand out among other applicants and even result in a follow-up interview for the job. 

Perfect Your Personal Pitch

How to Create an Elevator Pitch

Now you know the importance of an elevator pitch, here are the practical steps to developing your pitch. Download the free template below to start your own!

Know Yourself

First, you have to get to know yourself. While this may sound cliché, not many people don’t know what they like to do. Before developing your personal pitch, you must reflect on yourself. Think about the times you volunteered, worked on a project, did both inside and outside of school. Then brainstorm what you liked about those activities. What did you enjoy about them? What made you happy? On the other hand, think about what you dislike. What annoys you? Which activities did you enjoy the least? What are your weaknesses? 

If you are having a hard time figuring yourself out, go online, and take self-assessment tests such as MyPlan.com, 16personalities, and Big Five. You’ll be surprised by how much you’ll learn about yourself. These tests will be a great starting point for narrowing down your interests. 

Then, write down what you found out about yourself. Try to make some connections between the activities that you liked the most. You will be able to form your passionate statement, an essential part of developing your pitch. 

How Important is Language in Networking

Through your pitch, you are trying to sell ‘you.’ To sell yourself, you must be confident and be able to resonate that confidence to recruiters.

  • Vocabulary. Choose your words carefully. Avoid words like “um” or “like” which make you look unprofessional. Also, phrases like “I think” or “I’m not sure” only make recruiters question your qualifications because you seem doubtful about what you can bring to the company. 

  • Inflection. Emphasize what you want to highlight about yourself to recruiters. Slow down and stress on your key points and accomplishments so that the recruiters also see an eye-to-eye why you would be a great candidate for the job. 

  • Passion. Do you recall when you had a meaningful conversation with someone? That other person probably showed enthusiasm to get to know you more. Likewise, show excitement for the job, company, and recruiter using your tone, words, and body language. This way, the recruiters will begin to learn more about you because you are wanting to know more about them. Remember that you are selling ‘you.’ You are the product. You must be passionate about yourself first before selling it to others. 

Follow the I.P.E.N. Method to Develop Your Pitch

To begin developing your pitch, follow the I.P.E.N. method.

  • Introduction: Greet the recruiters with a firm handshake and eye contact. Say your name. 

  • Passionate Statement: Recall what you learned about yourself. Then write a sentence that begins like this: “I am passionate about….” 

  • Explain your passionate statement: Explain why and how you developed your passion. Give some examples from your previous and/or current experiences from volunteering, extracurricular activities, part-time jobs, etc. 

  • Next Step: Call-to-action for further conversations. Ask recruiters, “Would you like to hear more about my experiences?” or “Would you like to meet later this week?” Exchange contact information; ask for their LinkedIn. Finally, show excitement for follow-up meetings. 

Be creative in writing your pitch. Here’s a winning elevator pitch to inspire your creativity. You are unique and so should be your pitch. It should draw a good picture of who you are. After writing your pitch, be sure to practice! Delivering your pitch well is as important in selling ‘you’ and differentiating yourself from others. Good luck!   

Sources: 

  1. Petrone, P. (2014, February 14). Why You Should Have a Personal Elevator Pitch (And How to Make One). LinkedIn. https://learning.linkedin.com/blog/working-together/why-you-should-have-a-personal-elevator-pitch–and-how-to-do-it-

  2. Scott, E. [Monfort College]. (2020, February 19). Emmy Scott – 1st Place 2020 MCB Pitch Contest [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VinTh6mqMc

Kira Baker

Campaign Manager

Kira is a recent graduate from the University of Florida where she received her Master of Science in Entrepreneurship. She is passionate about helping businesses grow and connecting with new people. Some of her hobbies include traveling and hiking. She hope to visit all of the National Parks one day!

kira@thesellingfactory.com

Jared Glosser

Vice President

After graduating from UF in 2014 with a B.A. in history, Jared started his professional career Fundraising for a non-partisan political lobby in South Florida. In 2016, Jared moved back to Gainesville to work for a non-profit, recruit students for international travel opportunities, and pursue his MBA at UF. Jared has been with The Selling Factory since 2019 focusing on operations, client onboarding, and client success.

jared@thesellingfactory.com

Ian Massenburg

Chief Operating Officer

A graduate of University of Florida (B.A. 2001), Ian Massenburg brings over 18 years of sales executive and sales management experience to The Selling Factory. Before coming on-board, Ian worked alongside Brad at Infinite Energy, and then spent his next 3 years as VP of Partnerships selling SaaS products B2B. Ian brings his vast knowledge and experience to the team and to our partner companies served.

ian@thesellingfactory.com

Damien Paulk

Campaign Manager

Damien is a University of Florida graduate that recently joined the team full time after working as a Sales Development Intern for one year. As a Campaign Manager, Damien looks forward to contributing to the growth and success of The Selling Factory. When Damien is not at work he enjoys exploring Gainesville with his girlfriend and dog or watching the Gators dominate college football.

damien@thesellingfactory.com

Brendan Viehman

Campaign Manager

Brendan graduated from Liberty University with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Project Management. For the past 5 years, he has enjoyed working with blockchain technology and cryptocurrency development. In his free time, he surfs and makes personal finance videos for his YouTube channel.

brendan@thesellingfactory.com

Savannah Howard

Campaign Manager

A graduate from the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications, Savannah obtained her Bachelor of Science in public relations with a concentration in French. After almost two years as a sales development intern for The Selling Factory, she joined the leadership team in 2021 taking on the role of Campaign Manager. In her free time, Savannah enjoys going to concerts and festivals and cooking for her friends and family.

savannah@thesellingfactory.com

Zack Kampf

Campaign Manager

Zack is a creative technologist with experience in advertising, event planning, and game design. He started as an SDR in 2018 and has been with TSF ever since. Upon graduating UF in 2019 he became a campaign manager and is currently seeking a master's degree from NYU. In his spare time, you can find him at the intersection of Art & Technology!

zack@thesellingfactory.com

Josiah Blakemore

Campaign Manager

Josiah has over 8 years of sales experience, worked with Brad and Ian at Infinite Energy, and also spent time selling SaaS as Director of Partnerships at SharpSpring. He’s always been very competitive and has a love for sports and games. He enjoys solving problems and coaching team members to do the same!

josiah@thesellingfactory.com

Sue-Ming Frauenhofer

Marketing Manager

Sue-Ming received both her B.S. in Psychology and M.S. in Management from The University of Florida. As a student, she led a psychology research lab on goal achievement and life satisfaction and took on multiple roles while interning at The Selling Factory, including sales development, marketing, and recruiting, eventually leading to her current role as Marketing Manager. Through her creative and methodical vision, she engages both students and entrepreneurs to help them find their version of success.

sueming@thesellingfactory.com

Adam Grossman

Chief Development Officer

Adam is an ordained rabbi, who has founded multiple ventures focused on workforce development. Hired as CEO by a failing non-profit, in over 5 years, his ingenuity saved the organization, which led Slingshotfund.org to recognize it as one of North America’s most innovative Jewish non-profits. His expertise to identify, cultivate, and on-board talent ensures our student teams meet our partners’ needs.

adam@thesellingfactory.com

Brad Gamble

Chief Executive Officer

After graduating from UF in 1999 with a B.S.B.A, Brad Gamble has dedicated himself to sales management, branding, coaching, and building companies. He served as the VP of Sales & Marketing for Infinite Energy until 2014, when he founded The Selling Factory. He has dedicated himself to teaching critical skills to tomorrow’s leaders, and helping companies achieve sales success and revenue growth.

brad@thesellingfactory.com